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Attention New and Expectant Moms:
Get Treated For Postpartum Depression Symptoms...Right Now!

Postpartum depression symptoms are sometimes mistaken for the baby blues.

Just about every mother, especially new moms, will experience some depression and overwhelm when caring for a new baby.

But for millions of moms with postpartum depression the initial sadness, irritability, and mood swings lingers weeks or months after giving birth.


Attention New and Expectant Moms: 
Get Treated For Postpartum Depression Symptoms...Right Now!

Image Credit: Pixabay



Attention New and Expectant Moms: 
Get Treated For Postpartum Depression Symptoms...Right Now!

Image Credit: Pixabay


Should You Seek Treatment
Before or After Your Baby Is Born?

Like many forms of depression, postpartum depression (PPD) can be effectively treated. But I think the real problem lies in women not seeking help early enough or worse yet denying themselves treatment at all.

According to a 2014 Baby Center survey, many women feel that they can deal with symptoms on their own without any outside help. Other women, out of the 1,400 surveyed, said they felt ashamed at even needing help for depression.

A whopping 40 percent of the women surveyed admitted to not seeking any medical help. This isn't surprising with the stigma surrounding depression.

Perhaps postpartum depression has an even greater stigma because everyone believes that having a baby is supposed to increase your happiness by ten fold. And if you're sad then you're not normal. 

This theory may be true because 16 percent of the women surveyed reported not wanting to be labeled as mentally ill.

Attention New and Expectant Moms: 

If you think that you may have postpartum depression, or even if you think you have the baby blues, seek medical attention right away. 

Forget what others will think about you. Your happiness and the happiness and well being of your child are first most important. 

Unfortunately, many doctors don't discuss postpartum depression with expectant and new moms nearly enough. So you'll have to take the bull by the horns, so to speak, and broach the subject with your doctor or OB-GYN.  

Recent studies point to the importance of screening expendant moms for depression and beginning treatment way before the birth of the baby. Prevention  especially important if depression runs in your family and/or you've experienced depression in the past. 

Watch Out for These
Postpartum Depression Symptoms

At first, postpartum depression can seem a lot like typical baby blues, and can even share similar symptoms like mood swings, insomnia, irritability, and sadness. 

But the difference is that baby blues usually melt away a couple of weeks after giving birth, and postpartum depression sticks around for a longer amount of time.

Besides the symptoms mentioned above you should also look out for:

-Feelings of worthlessness

-Feeling overwhelmed

-Unexpected crying spells

-Having thoughts of harming the baby or harming yourself

-Withdrawing from your partner

-Feeling unable to bond with your new baby

-Feeling overly anxious

-Hallucinations 

-Having paranoid and irrational beliefs about the baby and yourself as a mother

-Suicidal thoughts or actions

-Being unable to eat or sleep

If this sounds like you, or if these symptoms describe someone you love, please get help right away!

You may also want to consider this screening tool.

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale is a screening tool designed to detect postpartum depression.

 A score of 13 and up suggests you may need to speak to your health care provider right away. Click here to take the quiz now.

Postpartum depression may be common, but that doesn't mean it's not treatable. Like many forms of depression, one of the keys to treatment is attacking the depression before it strikes first.

Conventional Treatments
for Postpartum Depression Symptoms

Psychotherapy

Besides medications, psychotherapy or talk therapy is the most common conventional treatment for just about all types of depression.  There are various forms of psychotherapies, but for postpartum depression, interpersonal psychotherapy seems to be quite effective. 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is also effective for treating postpartum depression- especially negative thoughts.  Many moms with this type of depression have negative and unrealistic thoughts about being a good mother.  But CBT empowers moms to embrace realistic thought patterns.

Hormone Replacement Therapy

At the time of delivery, there's a dramatic drop in essential female hormones: estrogen and progesterone. This decline in hormones can contribute to the onset of postpartum depression in some women.

But hormone replacement therapy can help replenish depleted hormones. Speak with your doctor to see if hormone replacement therapy is right for you.

Antidepressant Medication

Taking antidepressant medications can be an option even during pregnancy. Think meds may be an option for you? Talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of using meds during pregnancy.

Natrual Treatment Options
for Postpartum Depression Symptoms

1. Pay Attention to Your Emotional Load

The time surrounding pregnancy, the birth of a child and the months following can be enormously stressful for parents. Yes, I'm of course counting dad too as men can also suffer from postpartum depression. 

It seems there's never enough time to do all the things needed. And new and expectant moms need to carve out some time to distress. Use this tips in these articles to help you chill out get centered.

Breathe Away Tension

Anti-Anxiety Self-Help Tips

Mindfulness Meditation

2. Get Up and Get Moving

I'm not going to bore you with a lecture on the importance of exercising. I'll only say that exercise is just as effective as antidepressants, not to mention safer.

Don't think you have the time or the energy to exercise?  

Just 5 to 10 minutes can be plenty to start you on the road to better emotional well-being.  Plus, working out is a natural energizer.

If you're a new mom wanting to ease back into exercise, this article will help you do just that.

3. Don't Skimp on Sleep

Yes, I know. Getting a good night's sleep virtually goes out the window when the baby arrives. This article offers some great tips to help you get more increase your shut eye. 

4. Get More Good Fats

Along with eating a healthy diet, studies show that consuming omega-3 fats like EPA and DHA are highly beneficial in relieving and even preventing postpartum depression symptoms.

As if relieving postpartum depression wasn't enough good news. Studies also show that consuming omega 3 fats, especially DHA is essential for increasing a baby's brain development during and after pregnancy.

But in addition to consuming good fats it's crucial to practice good nutrition. This article provides more info on the link between depression and nutrition. 

New Hope For Moms
With Postpartum Depression

A brand new study provides new hope for moms suffering from postpartum depression symptoms. This new hope is in the form of a nutritional kit containing three essential supplements that help to quell a surge of the brain protein called MAO-A.

 This brain protein surges after childbirth and depletes the natural feel good chemicals need to maintain a healthy mood: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. MAO-A may continue to increase post birth.


The study was small but promising, consisting of about 41 women. Half of the study group received the nutritional kit comprised of amino acids and a blueberry extract.

Results: On the fifth day after giving birth, the time when postpartum depression peaks, the supplement group were the most resilient to feelings of pessimism, dissatisfaction and lethargy. 

The nutritional kit consisted of tryptophan and tyrosine, amino acids needed by the body to help build muscles, cells, tissue, etc. These amino acids also help replenish the loss of the three mood-regulating chemicals, mentioned earlier.

The nutritional kit also contains a blueberry extract which is crucial for anti-oxidant effects.

Postpartum Depression Symptoms:
Addtional Reasources

Depression During and After Pregnancy – This article by Womenshealth.gov discusses prenatal and postpartum depression along with possible causes.  

Postpartum Depression Action Plan – This printable action plan is designed to help you cope with postpartum depression and how to take steps to feel better.



I hope this article helps you on your journey to better mental health!

Brighter skies are ahead,




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Week 1

This first installment focuses on the link between exercise, diet and good mental health.

Week 2

I'll talk about the importance of using relaxation techniques to lift your mood and calm your nerves, which in turn improves mental health. 

Week 3

This week all about using self-esteem to improve mental health and overall well-being. 

Week 4

This final week presents ways to reduce social media usage. Studies show that over consumption of social media contributes to anxiety and depression.

Click here to start this free e-course!




Week 1

This first installment focuses on the link between exercise, diet and good mental health.

Week 2

I'll talk about the importance of using relaxation techniques to lift your mood and calm your nerves, which in turn improves mental health. 

Week 3

This week all about using self-esteem to improve mental health and overall well-being. 

Week 4

This final week presents ways to reduce social media usage. Studies show that over consumption of social media contributes to anxiety and depression.

Click here to start this free e-course!